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The PandaWarrior Chronicles
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The PandaWarrior Chronicles

  #2111 (permalink)
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Even though this is about computers and sneakers, its applicable to life and trading as well.

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication, Leonardo da Vinci


Most people chose unhappiness over uncertainty, Tim Ferris
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  #2112 (permalink)
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Occasionally something comes along and lays out a concept so clearly and completely that its better to simply copy and paste than try to summarize and repost my own version of it. To that end, the following article by the guys at MT is worth a read and a print out to read every so often.

Without further ado, enjoy.

Hardcore Truth for CEOs and Traders ("The Hard Thing About Hard Things" Review)

Given the author's love of rap - and willingness to include rap lyrics as chapter intros - my only quibble with "The Hard Thing About Hard Things" was not referencing the most motivational rap song of all time: "Till I Collapse" by Eminem featuring Nate Dogg.

As the song begins, with Eminem talking over an army drill cadence:

"Cause sometimes you just feel tired, feel weak... and when you feel weak, you feel like you wanna just give up... but you got to search within you, and try to find the inner strength... and just pull that s-- out of you... and get that motivation to not give up, and not be a quitter... no matter how bad you wanna just fall flat on your face, and collapse..."

It's the ultimate theme song (if you like rap) for Horowitz' time as CEO of Loudcloud and later Opsware, going through hell - and being forged into steel via incredible trials by fire - along the hard, bloody road to success (seeing Opsware acquired for $1.6 billion). Highlighting lessons from that experience is the purpose of the book.

In another section, Horowitz distinguishes between okay CEOs and great CEOs by pointing out a difference in perspective on how they made it through killer trials. When Horowitz would ask fellow CEOs "how did you do it," as in "How did you survive that brutal gauntlet," okay CEOs would point to something specific. Whereas the great CEOs would simply boil it down to a simple hardcore essence: "I never quit."

They simply refused to give in or give out, as the "Till I Collapse" chorus puts it:

Til the roof comes off, til the lights go out
Til my legs give out, can't shut my mouth
Til the smoke clears out, am I high perhaps
I'm a rip this s-, til my bone collapse...

You must know what this means, on a deep level, to be a great CEO. And the same goes for traders. Nearly all traders, like nearly all CEOs, face their "time in the wilderness" - when nothing feels easy, everything feels impossible, and killer challenges press on every side.

I devoured "The Hard Thing About Hard Things" in less than 24 hours, having heard about it via youtube interview of Horowitz at a tech startup conference. The sense of realness - of someone who has been down in the mud and the blood and fought their way through - was absolutely compelling.

This book - basically a series of guidelines for CEOs and building a business - is not some fluffy management tome written by a theoretical management consultant with no personal concept of what brutally hard decisions are like. This is front-line reporting from a CEO who has gone to war... taken severe casualties... made series after series of life-or-death decisions... motivated troops in the trenches... and ultimately won. (As such, the book will almost certainly offend or turn off those with a more 'civilized', and less emotionally raw, perspective on company leadership.)


The book had triple resonance for on three fronts: Entrepreneur, CEO, and Trader. The "building a business" aspect spoke directly to our plans: Mercenary Trader, our financial publishing and trading education startup built on founder sweat equity, is on the cusp of critical mass after four-plus years of blood, sweat and tears. Our model is built around cultivating a true community of traders - monetizing the research we use to trade and invest our own funds (and those of clients), while educating members in our community (in a way that no one else does) that they might join us, share ideas and insights, and take their own trading to new heights.

In terms of hardcore challenges, we have already had to deal with questions like whether to sell a major piece of the business... how to handle joint venture projects (including a major software initiative) gone south... the bloody business of firing people (of course)... and lots of other things, all while managing capital simultaneously.

Ultimately we want to provide seed capital to the breakthrough star traders in our community, having trained them and equipped them with shared community resources - our own version of Julian Robertson's "Tiger Cubs" - and use flowback from publishing profits to further deepen and expand our research capabilities, even while creating a shared idea environment that fosters partnerships and even life-long friendships. Think hedge fund incubator crossed with "trader greatness training" and deep community value-add.

Not unlike what a great Silicon Valley firm cultivates for tech founders (and hence the tie-in to this review)... the VC model of A16Z (Horowitz' and Andreessen's firm) was compelling in this regard too, in the way they took a bunch of long-standing VC industry conventions and simply decided to blow them up.

(I found it hilarious, as an aside, that the historical reason VCs are extremely private, and totally disdainful of publicity, is because this is how the original banking houses did it, like the Rothschilds and whatnot - as Horowitz relates, those guys were publicity-shy because they so often funded both sides of wars.)

For the longest time, as Horowitz makes clear, VCs assumed that tech founders needed "adult supervision." Even worse, they would sometimes try to eyeball a founder to decide if they were "CEO material" based on appearance and superficial impressions, not unlike the worst practices of the redneck talent scouts in "Moneyball" pre-Billy Beane. One almost imagines choosing a candidate to lead an organization simply because he (or she) looks a little better in a tailored suit - which is apparently what actually happens, given an utter lack of substantive process.

Horowitz and Andreessen, in contrast, realized that great tech CEOs are MADE, not born - shaped and created via community experience and support - and that all the truly great tech companies were led to greatness by the passionate founders who created them in the first place (Jobs, Gates, Hewlett and Packard etc).

They thought tech founders would likely be in synch with a vision of empowering founders, rather than expecting to hand their passionate idea over to an empty suit... and they were right. So they set up A16Z, a different kind of VC firm, to facilitate that transition: "Making" the CEO out of the founder, or rather helping the founder to come into his own as CEO, through guidance and support.

This view had deep parallels with a great point of frustration, for yours truly, in respect to the trading industry: There are so many books, so much literature, talking about what makes for a "great trader," or what makes someone "trader material," not unlike someone being "CEO material."

But great traders, like great CEOs, are also MADE - it is at least partly an unnatural thing, as Horowitz says - and there is a huge amount of psychological and emotional development along the way. There is training needed for this stuff. And not the same old "cut losses and let profits run" stuff either, but real, deep, meaningful training. Having potential is not the same thing as being developed - not by a long shot.

Apart from the excellent (and very specific) insights into building, running and selling a business - and various aspects of CEO day-to-day - here are ten things from the book that struck me personally as to where the jobs of CEO and Trader overlap:

1) CEOs and Traders are paid to make decisions. The reason CEOs get paid so much (relative to normal jobs) is because they have to make the hard calls. The bigger the enterprise in question - the more that is riding on every key decision, for good or ill - the more important those decisions become. It's the same with traders: Pay is commensurate with good decision making, not activity level, and in synch with the size of one's asset base. It's not physically harder to run $100 million or $1 billion than, say, $10,000, but the trust required to be awarded stewardship of those assets has to be earned.

2) CEOs and Traders are always accountable. Whatever happens, "it's your fault." Good luck, bad luck, meteor strike, employee sabotage, doesn't matter. If it goes wrong, the negative outcome for the business - or for P&L - is laid at the feet of the CEO (or the trader). This is a mental and emotional burden that most people who haven't born that kind of permanent pressure don't understand.

3) CEOs and Traders need knowledge handed down. Colleagues and mentors who have been through comparable experiences, and can share wisdom, are truly invaluable. Horowitz underscored this repeatedly with key lessons learned from Bill Campbell, often at critical decision making junctures. Reinventing the wheel is just unnecessary, and highly dangerous, in contrast to tapping the seasoned wisdom of others who have already been through it.

4) CEOs and Traders need a support network. Both of these can be incredibly lonely jobs at times. The weight of hard decision making - which no one can take off your shoulders - can create a sense of feeling isolated. Employees, family and friends can't help with this burden. Sometimes they even add to it (though not intentionally), by being party to the outcome of the decision (but not the requirement of making it). There is no substitute for having friends and mentors at arm's length from the situation - fellow CEOs, fellow traders - who know what this is like, and can empathize and share while remaining removed from the situation itself.

5) CEOs and Traders need ability to handle "the struggle." The description of "the struggle" was one of my favorite parts of the book. It's a description of the dark times, as in the REALLY dark times, like dark on the way to pitch black. Even if you get super lucky and avoid it, you need mental preparation for the day "the struggle" potentially comes. Going through it is a rite of passage.

6) CEOs and traders need a healthy tolerance for pain. This is different than "the struggle." Pain tolerance is required even when things are going well. In a world where competition for scarce resources is the natural order of things, achieving excellence is always hard. There is no such thing as perfect - mistakes are inevitable, sometimes big ones. Indeed if there is a "secret to success," a willingness to endure pain - to fail forward, correct mistakes, and stay brutally honest and doggedly determined the entire time - would be it. It even becomes desirable (if not always possible) to enjoy the pain as it makes you stronger.

7) CEOs and Traders need deep cognizance of their own psychology. On the outside, as Horowitz says, everything is always "great" and "amazing" and otherwise perfect for those who ask. Inside, emotions can be tossed about like a ship on a storm. This requires more than just "suck it up" psychological fortitude. It requires a nuanced awareness of one's personal psychology and ability to manage it.

8) CEOs and Traders need "Wartime" skills. Horowitz' distinction of "peacetime CEOs" and "wartime CEOs" applies to traders too. There are markets where everything is unfolding nicely and confident optimism is richly rewarded; and then there are markets where the manning of battle stations and ruthless risk control win the day. While most traders, like most CEOs, will more naturally gravitate to "peacetime" skill sets, the potential for war must always be accounted for.

9) CEOs and Traders need trial by fire. How do you know if you've got what it takes? Get thrown in the shark tank and see what happens. It's not enough to do okay in favorable conditions. The water has to get bloody. There is no way to deny this or shy away from this, if the goal is to play for meaningful stakes. Playing for real stakes in the real world means being tested.

10) CEOs and Traders always have opportunity. As the book puts it, "there is always a move." If you feel completely boxed into a situation with no way out, you may not be thinking hard enough (or creatively enough). When it comes to strategic decision making, the deep complexity and open-boundary nature of the sheer number of options available can be ruthlessly intimidating in one sense, but intoxicating and freeing in another sense. If thriving in conditions of uncertainty doesn't sound appealing, then as with pain tolerance, you may want a different gig.

In conclusion, CEOs and traders have the coolest jobs on the planet. What other careers let you strategically and tactically allocate resources, sometimes vast quantities of such, with sky-is-the-limit potential for profit creation and impactful change? What others jobs are so ruthlessly demanding, yet so ultimately fulfilling, while remaining interesting almost every single day? What other jobs not only require, but DEMAND, such an elite and diverse array of skillsets, including management capabilities both external and internal? Very few.

If you are serious about building a business, becoming a CEO, or stepping up your game as a trader via leadership lessons with strong cross-application to trading, buy this book.

If no-holds-barred honesty is a turn-off and you prefer a rose-colored-glasses view of reality, however, don't buy this book. It pulls no punches, which is fantastic for those with the clear-eyed courage of Thucydides:"The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it."


Me again. I think this is an important post for traders to really internalize, especially beginning traders. In the next couple of days I am going to post a couple of trades from this week and perhaps a video. Yesterday and today were such fantastic educational days it would be a shame to let them drift into memory without really internalizing their lessons.

More to follow.

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication, Leonardo da Vinci


Most people chose unhappiness over uncertainty, Tim Ferris
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  #2113 (permalink)
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  #2114 (permalink)
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PandaWarrior View Post
I'm also trading far less than I was. One or two trades a day. Maybe 4 if I have a couple of losers.

The key to this game, let the winners run. its as simple as that.

Brian, I think this is great news and wanted to congratulate you for making it this far!

Mike

Due to time constraints, please do not PM me if your question can be resolved or answered on the forum.

Need help?
1) Stop changing things. No new indicators, charts, or methods. Be consistent with what is in front of you first.
2) Start a journal and post to it daily with the trades you made to show your strengths and weaknesses.
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4) Accept responsibility for your actions. Stop looking elsewhere to explain away poor performance.
5) Where to start as a trader? Watch this webinar and read this thread for hundreds of questions and answers.
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  #2115 (permalink)
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Big Mike View Post
Brian, I think this is great news and wanted to congratulate you for making it this far!

Mike

The more I trade, the more I realize that trading less is more. I've been sustaining a 36-40% win rate now for many months. No matter what I do, I can't seem to get that much higher. I had it up to around 44% for a while but couldn't sustain it. As the win rate has stabilized around 40%, the profitability has also stabilized. My equity curve while not spectacular is steady and thats more than I've ever had before.

Its an odd thing to win while losing 60% of the time.

A couple more interesting things to add.
  • Position sizing has more to do with profitability than entry location
  • The exit is by far more important than the entry
  • 1:1 RR and a 75% win rate isn't sustainable for most people

Anyway, thanks a lot and hope you are enjoying your new home.....

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication, Leonardo da Vinci


Most people chose unhappiness over uncertainty, Tim Ferris
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  #2116 (permalink)
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I very rarely try new indicators much less buy them and I've never really recommended one before, however over the last few months I've thought about looking at alternative DOM's. For the most part, all I wanted was to see profile type information on the DOM instead of on the chart and perhaps have a bit more control over the look and feel of the DOM.

I've looked at a couple and while I do not believe I will end up changing from the default Ninja DOM which in the final analysis is more than enough for my needs. I didn't use the DOM information as much as I thought and since I'm not a scalper in the strictest sense of the word, a robust DOM doesn't seem to enhance my trading to much. That may change over time but for now, I wanted to write a brief review of the DOM I found to be the most to my liking.

I ended up testing out the 9G DOM for over a week. At first it took a bit for me to get it set up and familiar with how the menus worked. Since I'd gotten the DOM from Optimus Trading Group, I rang up John @Optimus and he walked me through the set up and once he pointed me in the right direction, it was pretty intuitive from that point forward. Intuitive software is something I demand and one main reason I stick with Ninja. I've tried several platforms and all of them seem to have vast levels of complexity that I simply do not like.

Anyway back to the DOM, once I got it set up, it worked as advertised. It was simple to enter orders, handled my existing ATM's with ease and in general performed flawlessly.

One of the cool features I like about it is you can include a column on the DOM that indicates where you are in the queue. If you are using limit orders for entries, this makes it easy to guesstimate if you will be filled based on the number of existing orders at that level and how many orders are in front of you. This is a great feature just for the mental aspect of trading.

Another thing I like about the DOM is the MP or VP capability it has. It turned out I didn't really use this aspect much and I know other DOMS have this feature so its not really unique but it is a worthwhile feature to have if you are an MP or VP trader. I'll probably continue to have this on the DOM and see if there's anyway I can integrate these levels into my trading in the future.

The main strength of the DOM is its flexibility. The user can customize it almost indefinitely. In fact I got bored with all the options and defaulted to the factory presets for most of it. I did change some colors and even though I experimented with different locations for the buttons, (you can put the buttons on the bottom, top or on either side), I ended up keeping them on top. I added an auto center button and an ATM picker. One complaint I had with the user added buttons was that I chose to put them at the bottom, the menus did not recognize they were at the bottom of the screen and expand up, instead they expanded downward where I could not see them at all.

I think many users will appreciate the ability to have multiple instruments on the same DOM. You simply add the instruments and then you can easily switch between them by clicking on the instrument at the bottom. All the standard DOM actions are available across all instruments. This allows you to track multiple instruments on your chart without having multiple DOMs to trade them. However, since I only trade CL, no real need for this feature.

Overall, I think the DOM is worth the money. Its a one time fee ( I HATE monthly leases) and you get great support. (at least from Optimus, I did not have any interaction with the actual software vendor.) If you are looking for a high end replacement for the Ninja DOM, I think this one is the best on the market. Of course bear in mind I am NOT an expert here, I'm just giving my opinion on a piece of software I decided to try and ended up liking.

I'm still deciding on if I'll continue to use it long term or stay with NT's DOM, however the fact that I've stayed with it for a week is a good sign. I normally abandon new software within minutes if its not intuitive or isn't immediately useful.

I'll give another report in a week or two and if I stay with it, I'll post up the features I find most useful to me personally and if there are any issues that come up.

Please register on futures.io to view futures trading content such as post attachment(s), image(s), and screenshot(s).

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication, Leonardo da Vinci


Most people chose unhappiness over uncertainty, Tim Ferris
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  #2117 (permalink)
Elite Member
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Welcome to the 9G crowd, my brother...


PandaWarrior View Post
I very rarely try new indicators much less buy them and I've never really recommended one before, however over the last few months I've thought about looking at alternative DOM's. For the most part, all I wanted was to see profile type information on the DOM instead of on the chart and perhaps have a bit more control over the look and feel of the DOM.

I've looked at a couple and while I do not believe I will end up changing from the default Ninja DOM which in the final analysis is more than enough for my needs. I didn't use the DOM information as much as I thought and since I'm not a scalper in the strictest sense of the word, a robust DOM doesn't seem to enhance my trading to much. That may change over time but for now, I wanted to write a brief review of the DOM I found to be the most to my liking.

I ended up testing out the 9G DOM for over a week. At first it took a bit for me to get it set up and familiar with how the menus worked. Since I'd gotten the DOM from Optimus Trading Group, I rang up John @Optimus and he walked me through the set up and once he pointed me in the right direction, it was pretty intuitive from that point forward. Intuitive software is something I demand and one main reason I stick with Ninja. I've tried several platforms and all of them seem to have vast levels of complexity that I simply do not like.

Anyway back to the DOM, once I got it set up, it worked as advertised. It was simple to enter orders, handled my existing ATM's with ease and in general performed flawlessly.

One of the cool features I like about it is you can include a column on the DOM that indicates where you are in the queue. If you are using limit orders for entries, this makes it easy to guesstimate if you will be filled based on the number of existing orders at that level and how many orders are in front of you. This is a great feature just for the mental aspect of trading.

Another thing I like about the DOM is the MP or VP capability it has. It turned out I didn't really use this aspect much and I know other DOMS have this feature so its not really unique but it is a worthwhile feature to have if you are an MP or VP trader. I'll probably continue to have this on the DOM and see if there's anyway I can integrate these levels into my trading in the future.

The main strength of the DOM is its flexibility. The user can customize it almost indefinitely. In fact I got bored with all the options and defaulted to the factory presets for most of it. I did change some colors and even though I experimented with different locations for the buttons, (you can put the buttons on the bottom, top or on either side), I ended up keeping them on top. I added an auto center button and an ATM picker. One complaint I had with the user added buttons was that I chose to put them at the bottom, the menus did not recognize they were at the bottom of the screen and expand up, instead they expanded downward where I could not see them at all.

I think many users will appreciate the ability to have multiple instruments on the same DOM. You simply add the instruments and then you can easily switch between them by clicking on the instrument at the bottom. All the standard DOM actions are available across all instruments. This allows you to track multiple instruments on your chart without having multiple DOMs to trade them. However, since I only trade CL, no real need for this feature.

Overall, I think the DOM is worth the money. Its a one time fee ( I HATE monthly leases) and you get great support. (at least from Optimus, I did not have any interaction with the actual software vendor.) If you are looking for a high end replacement for the Ninja DOM, I think this one is the best on the market. Of course bear in mind I am NOT an expert here, I'm just giving my opinion on a piece of software I decided to try and ended up liking.

I'm still deciding on if I'll continue to use it long term or stay with NT's DOM, however the fact that I've stayed with it for a week is a good sign. I normally abandon new software within minutes if its not intuitive or isn't immediately useful.

I'll give another report in a week or two and if I stay with it, I'll post up the features I find most useful to me personally and if there are any issues that come up.

Please register on futures.io to view futures trading content such as post attachment(s), image(s), and screenshot(s).



AJ
Nashville, Tennessee


"Life On The Edge of SR"
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  #2118 (permalink)
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Happy Birthday, Brian!!!

@PandaWarrior
they say it's your birthday
it's my birthday too, yeah
no kidding...04/03/1953

-g

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  #2119 (permalink)
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@PandaWarrior

Happy Birthday Brian!!! Have a GREAT day!!!

Rick

"If you're going to panic during a trade............. panic early."
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  #2120 (permalink)
Elite Member
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Favorite Futures: NQ, YM and ES
 
tderrick's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,589 since Sep 2010
Thanks: 4,260 given, 2,527 received


Happy belated birthday, brother


AJ
Nashville, Tennessee


"Life On The Edge of SR"
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