Current PC Specs - Tech Support | futures io social day trading
futures io futures trading


Current PC Specs
Updated: Views / Replies:7,077 / 45
Created: by tderrick Attachments:2

Welcome to futures io.

(If you already have an account, login at the top of the page)

futures io is the largest futures trading community on the planet, with over 90,000 members. At futures io, our goal has always been and always will be to create a friendly, positive, forward-thinking community where members can openly share and discuss everything the world of trading has to offer. The community is one of the friendliest you will find on any subject, with members going out of their way to help others. Some of the primary differences between futures io and other trading sites revolve around the standards of our community. Those standards include a code of conduct for our members, as well as extremely high standards that govern which partners we do business with, and which products or services we recommend to our members.

At futures io, our focus is on quality education. No hype, gimmicks, or secret sauce. The truth is: trading is hard. To succeed, you need to surround yourself with the right support system, educational content, and trading mentors Ė all of which you can find on futures io, utilizing our social trading environment.

With futures io, you can find honest trading reviews on brokers, trading rooms, indicator packages, trading strategies, and much more. Our trading review process is highly moderated to ensure that only genuine users are allowed, so you donít need to worry about fake reviews.

We are fundamentally different than most other trading sites:
  • We are here to help. Just let us know what you need.
  • We work extremely hard to keep things positive in our community.
  • We do not tolerate rude behavior, trolling, or vendors advertising in posts.
  • We firmly believe in and encourage sharing. The holy grail is within you, we can help you find it.
  • We expect our members to participate and become a part of the community. Help yourself by helping others.

You'll need to register in order to view the content of the threads and start contributing to our community.  It's free and simple.

-- Big Mike, Site Administrator

Reply
 2  
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 

Current PC Specs

  #31 (permalink)
Elite Member
Toronto, Canada
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: NinjaTrader, MT4
Broker/Data: Amp/CQG, Citibank
Favorite Futures: CL, GC, 6E, ES, TF, EURUSD, GBPJPY, AUDUSD
 
Beljevina's Avatar
 
Posts: 349 since Sep 2010
Thanks: 379 given, 564 received


Futures Operator View Post
Do you think a workstation made by these companies would be more reliable than one built at home with similar quality workstation level parts?

Is ECC memory worthwhile, for a trading computer?

I used to work/manage higher level customer/enterprise support for a company not mentioned here but bigger than all of them , and, there is no reason to believe the quality is better than brand name components that you would put together into your own home-built system.

PC/desktop 'manufacturers' factor in component cost, quality, serviceability and profit into what they build as a all-in-one system. And, each of those big companies have varying quality lines of PCs. Lenovo for example, makes some of the cheapest laptops for the mass market, but also arguably some of the best quality units for the discerning business customer (ThinkPads). With desktops, corporations often spec to order motherboards from not necessarily the best manufacturers, and can use lower quality components or skimp on them all together. There are plenty of verifiable scenarios where those companies leave out components or use lower spec components, that can lead to higher customer failures in the field; engineers have to get approval from finance on things like resistors, capacitors, etc - leaving them off motherboards can amount to hundreds of thousands of dollars not spent. (per component)

They balance failure rates against cost to repair them. When you build with individual components - given you'll choose reasonable/better quality components - and you know how to put them together, and do troubleshooting when something fails, you will likely be in a position to replace a defective PSU, motherboard, hard disk or whatever has failed, more quickly and easily, and probably with less down-time and pain than you would with a brand name system.

Too many brand name corporations you listed customize the case specs, motherboard mounting holes, give limited hard drive/bay expansion options. They often use low range power supplies, with limited wattage. Motherboards often lack expansion slots (for adding video cards/monitors), and memory slots are usually limited to 2 or 4 - all those latter things I noted are things you can shop for with a motherboard that you will choose, spending a few $ more, but having decent expansion options down the road.

In terms of overall individual component failures, I can't think of a reason why a major manufacturer's all-in-one PC would have better reliability than one you (properly) build yourself.

Reply With Quote
The following 2 users say Thank You to Beljevina for this post:
 
  #32 (permalink)
Elite Member
New York, NY
 
Futures Experience: Intermediate
Platform: Sierra Chart, thinkorswim
Broker/Data: Amp-Rithmic/TT, IB
Favorite Futures: CL, GC, NQ
 
Posts: 569 since Nov 2010
Thanks: 1,797 given, 249 received


Beljevina View Post
I used to work/manage higher level customer/enterprise support for a company not mentioned here but bigger than all of them , and, there is no reason to believe the quality is better than brand name components that you would put together into your own home-built system.

PC/desktop 'manufacturers' factor in component cost, quality, serviceability and profit into what they build as a all-in-one system. And, each of those big companies have varying quality lines of PCs. Lenovo for example, makes some of the cheapest laptops for the mass market, but also arguably some of the best quality units for the discerning business customer (ThinkPads). With desktops, corporations often spec to order motherboards from not necessarily the best manufacturers, and can use lower quality components or skimp on them all together. There are plenty of verifiable scenarios where those companies leave out components or use lower spec components, that can lead to higher customer failures in the field; engineers have to get approval from finance on things like resistors, capacitors, etc - leaving them off motherboards can amount to hundreds of thousands of dollars not spent. (per component)

They balance failure rates against cost to repair them. When you build with individual components - given you'll choose reasonable/better quality components - and you know how to put them together, and do troubleshooting when something fails, you will likely be in a position to replace a defective PSU, motherboard, hard disk or whatever has failed, more quickly and easily, and probably with less down-time and pain than you would with a brand name system.

Too many brand name corporations you listed customize the case specs, motherboard mounting holes, give limited hard drive/bay expansion options. They often use low range power supplies, with limited wattage. Motherboards often lack expansion slots (for adding video cards/monitors), and memory slots are usually limited to 2 or 4 - all those latter things I noted are things you can shop for with a motherboard that you will choose, spending a few $ more, but having decent expansion options down the road.

In terms of overall individual component failures, I can't think of a reason why a major manufacturer's all-in-one PC would have better reliability than one you (properly) build yourself.

Thanks for your reply, these are some great points, although I have to disagree on a couple, based on my personal experience, which is likely not as statistically significant as yours.

I have a business Lenovo W520 with FHD 1080p display, Developer Workstation, on Win 7 Pro, 64 bit, i7, it has been a POS for me. Runs hot, BSODs, takes 5.5 minutes to boot, keeps switching off external monitor, drops my datafeed connection and won't reconnect until full reboot, etc etc. I've owned several older ThinkPads, and have seen the quality of them decline over time, since IBM sold the Thinkpad line to Lenovo.

When you mention all in one/desktop PC's, are you talking about retail/home PC's, or business workstations made by major manufacturer's? Or are you saying there is not much difference?

One potential reason on why a manufactured workstation could be more reliable than a home built one, is that a manufacturer should have tested/proven the compatibility of all hardware/software/drivers/configuration etc together, where as with a home built one, you will be doing this testing yourself, and problems may take time/specific conditions to show up.

Reply With Quote
 
  #33 (permalink)
Elite Member
Toronto, Canada
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: NinjaTrader, MT4
Broker/Data: Amp/CQG, Citibank
Favorite Futures: CL, GC, 6E, ES, TF, EURUSD, GBPJPY, AUDUSD
 
Beljevina's Avatar
 
Posts: 349 since Sep 2010
Thanks: 379 given, 564 received



Futures Operator View Post
I have a business Lenovo W520 with FHD 1080p display, Developer Workstation, on Win 7 Pro, 64 bit, i7, it has been a POS for me. Runs hot, BSODs, takes 5.5 minutes to boot, keeps switching off external monitor, drops my datafeed connection and won't reconnect until full reboot, etc etc. I've owned several older ThinkPads, and have seen the quality of them decline over time, since IBM sold the Thinkpad line to Lenovo.

Hard to argue with that (bad) personal experience, isn't it - sounds like segments of potentially bad hardware and software engineering. I too have had many Thinkpads, and the problems have been rare, and almost always resolvable. But I agree when Lenovo took over, things left big-blue's control, nor did they care much; and, what was contracted as expectations from the new owner (as part of the post-sale process of departing IBM), compared to what Lenovo actually delivered became a huge gap. Not to mention, penny-pinching was taken to a whole new level - employees on all levels - former IBMers - were introduced to a new world, that was often unpleasant. I'd kept in touch with many of them at the marketing and support areas, since we were colleagues for decades, and what they were asked to do, with lesser resources, had all sorts of impact. (gee, I wonder where I worked --- the secret is out )


Futures Operator View Post
When you mention all in one/desktop PC's, are you talking about retail/home PC's, or business workstations made by major manufacturer's? Or are you saying there is not much difference?

One potential reason on why a manufactured workstation could be more reliable than a home built one, is that a manufacturer should have tested/proven the compatibility of all hardware/software/drivers/configuration etc together, where as with a home built one, you will be doing this testing yourself, and problems may take time/specific conditions to show up.

The level of testing done by major computer brand-name manufacturers has fallen tremendously over the last decade. They will do incredibly little if any compatability testing - they will depend on the component supplier's word, and, if something major occurs once the boxes start hitting the field, they will try to stick it to the supplier, technically and/or legally (ie., push back to the motherboard manufacturer) I don't think the brand-name manufacturers play up those points as part of their marketing, so, don't just assume compatibility testing was significant or even occurred. The major desktop manufacturers are more concerned with grabbing market share, and maximizing profit, while having to pay for more expensive post-sale service/warranties, on what is arguably a more expensive unit to service (due to cost of mailing in a whole desktop, or, dispatching a onsite technician, then after you are 'whole' again, testing for the failed component in the desktop, doing it's rebuild/teardown, etc.) - than say is the cost for Asus or Corsair to provide you a new motherboard or power supply.

It's just that with brand-name PCs you really lose more than you gain IMO, over building your own PC. 'Manufacturers' load up all sorts of crap and bloatware. They use borderline power supplies. Limited expansion slots. Limited memory slots. They mix'n'match motherboards, both hardware and firmware. They use different network chips, sound chips, video cards for different models, they have to sub out parts ... it's hard for them to create thousands or tens of thousands of systems with exactly the same motherboard BIOSs, hard drives, video cards, etc ... plus, in giving customers 'choice' to add what they want to their systems, I just don't see how they can test the combination of all those various components any better than someone building their own.

Not to mention, as new software comes along (video drivers, other driver updates, OS updates, etc.) - compatibility issues for a brand-name PC vs. a home build would fare no better IMHO. I've build dozens of PCs, and have many throughout my home, and I've run into minimal issues, TBH, at least not ones I couldn't somehow resolve. It must be those closetfulls of hardware that I have, being able to swap components in and out.

Reply With Quote
The following 3 users say Thank You to Beljevina for this post:
 
  #34 (permalink)
Elite Member
Berlin, Europe
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: NinjaTrader, MultiCharts
Broker/Data: Interactive Brokers
Favorite Futures: Keyboard
 
Fat Tails's Avatar
 
Posts: 9,653 since Mar 2010
Thanks: 4,226 given, 25,601 received
Forum Reputation: Legendary


Beljevina View Post
It's just that with brand-name PCs you really lose more than you gain IMO, over building your own PC. 'Manufacturers' load up all sorts of crap and bloatware. They use borderline power supplies. Limited expansion slots. Limited memory slots.

The real question is how much worth is your own time. I have bought a HP Xeon workstation and then added two graphic adapters for less than $ 1,300. Then connected 3 Dell screens that came at $ 900. The whole thing is quiet and consumes less than 100 W including screens and an external hard disk. Regarding power supplies, expansion and memory slots: I am capable of reading the specifications of the workstation and selecting the model accordingly.

I could have certainly saved a few dollars by building it myself, but I prefer to spend that time to do something useful or have a ride on my bicycle.....

Reply With Quote
The following user says Thank You to Fat Tails for this post:
 
  #35 (permalink)
Elite Member
NC, USA
 
Futures Experience: None
Platform: None Yet
Favorite Futures: Guitar
 
MrYou's Avatar
 
Posts: 403 since Jun 2011
Thanks: 618 given, 193 received

Fat Tails makes a good point: How much is your time worth?

A lot of the benefits of going with a major manufacturer is their technical and warranty support.

Most of them offer onsite warranty replacement support and you can deal directly with them for any hardware replacement issues.

In some cases when you build your own PC you'll have to deal with the manufacturer to replace hardware vs the business you bought the product from. This can be a pain compared to quick replacement from a major manufacturer.

Reply With Quote
 
  #36 (permalink)
Elite Member
Toronto, Canada
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: NinjaTrader, MT4
Broker/Data: Amp/CQG, Citibank
Favorite Futures: CL, GC, 6E, ES, TF, EURUSD, GBPJPY, AUDUSD
 
Beljevina's Avatar
 
Posts: 349 since Sep 2010
Thanks: 379 given, 564 received

Fair responses all around, but I guess I am weird and often enjoy building my own stuff, and knowing what I put into it, and how it all works. My neighbor is a great example: he had a $60K hydraulic car hoist built into his garage floor, so that he can do the repair work on his Maserati, BMW, and Rover, by himself. I also do woodworking and a host of other things that I could buy ready made, usually for a lot less, but to me the benefits outweigh any negatives.

On PC technical support, it ain't what it used to be - I used to run huge global call centres, and the quality of support just isn't there. Sure, warranty can be good, but, if one is in a urban center, one can get the broken down built-it-myself PC part serviced quickly, or, just buy another, and then have a spare for an inevitable time when one needs it.

Reply With Quote
The following 3 users say Thank You to Beljevina for this post:
 
  #37 (permalink)
Elite Member
Manchester, NH
 
Futures Experience: Beginner
Platform: thinkorswim
Broker/Data: TD Ameritrade
Favorite Futures: Stocks
 
Posts: 902 since Jul 2012
Thanks: 603 given, 1,785 received


MrYou View Post
Fat Tails makes a good point: How much is your time worth?

A lot of the benefits of going with a major manufacturer is their technical and warranty support.

Most of them offer onsite warranty replacement support and you can deal directly with them for any hardware replacement issues.

In some cases when you build your own PC you'll have to deal with the manufacturer to replace hardware vs the business you bought the product from. This can be a pain compared to quick replacement from a major manufacturer.

I generally save 25~30% off the initial cost from assembling my own PCs/servers as compared to buying a complete build. Moreover, the better performance (customizing your equipment easily gives a performance boost, makes it easier to overclock, and saves a huge fraction of computational time), together with careful choice of power-saving hardware (especially your PSU) easily earns back the cost of assembly.

My last straw with major manufacturers was when my laptop broke down at a time when I needed it for 16 hours per day. The warranty expired just days before my hard disk died, so I had to opt between spending $500 to get it repaired, or $1,800 to get a laptop with equivalent specs. It was a Sony with one of those early SSDs - I took it apart and figured I could have fixed it in a day if not that they got SanDisk to customize them a stupid 2" x 1.5"-looking-thing that was like a flat chip integrated onto the motherboard. They would send me a special Fedex prepaid package with the forms to fill and send back to their service center. The whole process took 5 weeks and several angry phone calls and emails.

Repairing your own assembly is easy. Most of the times, the part needs to be upgraded anyway, making a warranty claim pointless. In the worst case scenario, if you absolutely HAVE to file for a replacement, a common strategy is to buy a new part to replace the old one, and wait for the warranty replacement to arrive so you can sell it or salvage it (for a new platform or as a performance upgrade).



tderrick View Post
It looks like this topic hasn't been updated for awhile, so maybe this could stand as a new thread.

I have always been a Mac cat, so PC's are fairly alien to me. I run a PC partition on my Macbook so
I don't have a clue as to the hardware requirements of a decent rig.

I'm going to be getting a PC tower / desktop and need some information on what I will need to be looking
for. This trading thing is not going away, so I might as well have a correct rig to work on.

I want to run three screens.

Some of the PC speak I will need to be familiar with and part recommendations.

1. Brands ? I have no idea who the solid players are. Maybe Dell, HP or Compaq

2. Processor names / speed

3. Graphics cards to run my three monitors.

4. Hard drive space / hardware specs..

For those who have time, would you just leave a brief description to your trading computer on this
thread, focusing on the above subject matter??

Mucho thanks...

1. Depends.

2. Currently the best performance-for-value point is with Intel's Ivy Bridge processors, I'd make a rough guess: 3570K or 3770K for a $1300 system. If you absolutely need more performance, you'll have to build a cluster, use a LGA 2011 motherboard with double CPU socket, and/or wait for LGA 2011-based processors next year.

3. You'll want ATI's EyeInfinity cards to run three monitors on a single card, otherwise multiple cards via Crossfire/SLI. nVidia's cards save more power, though.

4. A 128 GB SSD for your OS and optional 1 TB drive for storage is the typical setup where you get the best performance and disk space per dollar. If you need redundancy for your data, I recommend Windows' software RAID over using motherboard RAID. (I learned this lesson when I had one of nVidia's earliest motherboards when they first came out with SLi and only supported it on their own motherboards. The motherboard died, and I couldn't find a replacement, and I lost my data anyway, even though it was in RAID.)

You can't really go wrong, but just pay attention to your power management and choice of monitors - if you carefully calculate, it can cost you more in the long run than you would from any other sales factor.

Reply With Quote
The following 2 users say Thank You to artemiso for this post:
 
  #38 (permalink)
Elite Member
New York, NY
 
Futures Experience: Intermediate
Platform: Sierra Chart, thinkorswim
Broker/Data: Amp-Rithmic/TT, IB
Favorite Futures: CL, GC, NQ
 
Posts: 569 since Nov 2010
Thanks: 1,797 given, 249 received


Beljevina View Post
Fair responses all around, but I guess I am weird and often enjoy building my own stuff, and knowing what I put into it, and how it all works. My neighbor is a great example: he had a $60K hydraulic car hoist built into his garage floor, so that he can do the repair work on his Maserati, BMW, and Rover, by himself. I also do woodworking and a host of other things that I could buy ready made, usually for a lot less, but to me the benefits outweigh any negatives.

I also am weird and enjoy doing things on my own sometimes that would be done more quickly, cheaply, and efficiently by someone else. I'm also anal/OCD/perfectionist about doing these things sometimes, lol.

Are workstation/server parts (cpu, graphics, ECC memory, etc) more reliable than mainstream consumer retail parts, or gaming focused parts?

Reply With Quote
 
  #39 (permalink)
Elite Member
Berlin, Europe
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: NinjaTrader, MultiCharts
Broker/Data: Interactive Brokers
Favorite Futures: Keyboard
 
Fat Tails's Avatar
 
Posts: 9,653 since Mar 2010
Thanks: 4,226 given, 25,601 received
Forum Reputation: Legendary


Futures Operator View Post
I also am weird and enjoy doing things on my own sometimes that would be done more quickly, cheaply, and efficiently by someone else. I'm also anal/OCD/perfectionist about doing these things sometimes, lol.

Are workstation/server parts (cpu, graphics, ECC memory, etc) more reliable than mainstream consumer retail parts, or gaming focused parts?

The workstation is not focused on gaming power but reliability. The only reason that I have opted for a Xeon processor is the error correction mode for the RAM. The discussion about ECC or NON-ECC is decades old, I am not starting it here again.

Otherwise there is no difference in reliability.

Reply With Quote
The following 2 users say Thank You to Fat Tails for this post:
 
  #40 (permalink)
Elite Member
New York, NY
 
Futures Experience: Intermediate
Platform: Sierra Chart, thinkorswim
Broker/Data: Amp-Rithmic/TT, IB
Favorite Futures: CL, GC, NQ
 
Posts: 569 since Nov 2010
Thanks: 1,797 given, 249 received



Fat Tails View Post
The workstation is not focused on gaming power but reliability. The only reason that I have opted for a Xeon processor is the error correction mode for the RAM. The discussion about ECC or NON-ECC is decades old, I am not starting it here again.

Otherwise there is no difference in reliability.

So based on your choice, you believe a workstation processor/mobo is worthwhile, due to ECC memory.

Are the other workstation parts, ie graphics cards, etc also more reliable, or are cheaper/higher performing consumer graphics cards as reliable?

Reply With Quote

Reply



futures io > > > > Current PC Specs

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Upcoming Webinars and Events (4:30PM ET unless noted)

Jigsaw Trading: TBA

Elite only

FuturesTrader71: TBA

Elite only

NinjaTrader: TBA

Jan 18

RandBots: TBA

Jan 23

GFF Brokers & CME Group: Futures & Bitcoin

Elite only

Adam Grimes: TBA

Elite only

Ran Aroussi: TBA

Elite only
     

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Confirming specs for new trading machine furytrader Tech Support 6 November 19th, 2015 07:38 AM
Desirable Monitor Specs TonyB Tech Support 83 August 11th, 2013 06:07 AM
Specs Selling ron99 Commodities Futures Trading 1 April 30th, 2012 01:00 PM
Desktop specs / TradingPC, video cards Zoethecus Tech Support 45 December 14th, 2010 10:09 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:33 AM.

Copyright © 2017 by futures io, s.a., Av Ricardo J. Alfaro, Century Tower, Panama, +507 833-9432, info@futures.io
All information is for educational use only and is not investment advice.
There is a substantial risk of loss in trading commodity futures, stocks, options and foreign exchange products. Past performance is not indicative of future results.
no new posts
Page generated 2017-12-14 in 0.18 seconds with 20 queries on phoenix via your IP 54.221.93.187