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Scattered thoughts...
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Scattered thoughts...

  #111 (permalink)
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An intro to Jason Silva:



Some, at least in my opinion, very cool pieces of art. But, seeing as most didn't like An Ode to the Brain, I have my doubts about how they will be perceived.











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  #112 (permalink)
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.....Second, I apologize for the lateness of my reply. I have too much going on these days, and, also partly because of my ADD, I haven't managed to answer you until now. Please don't perceive it as a reflection of my thoughts about your thoughts about my thoughts.


To be perfectly honest, I've never liked Rand. I've always referred to her as the philosopher for the non-philosopher. I started reading Nietzsche in high school, and I didn't come across Rand until years later. I could only see a bastardization of his ideas, yet she claims to be his superior. But, I digress...I watched the documentary "Transcendent Man" a little while back, and I was quite fascinated. I like stuff like that. Jason Silva is also coming out with a documentary soon, and I'm a fan of his philosopical ramblings.



Brisbane? Are you living down under? I lived in Brisbane a few years back, and I'm currently contemplating moving back to Australia. It would be nice to make some new friends. I'm more likely to settle in Sydney, though.


I don't use EW in my trading, but I studied it briefly years ago. I went through a wave phase, delving into the works of Kondratiev, Hurst and Armstrong. It's hard not to like the concept of phi. Trading is all about exploiting the gyrations, though. That much I agree with.

LOL...no worries...as the Aussies say.

I am pretty sure I would have the same point of view as you about Rand, if I had read Nietzsche, alas I am indeed much more ignorant than I care to admit.

Live in brisbane - no, on vacation for a month, or two, or three....

Having lived in 6 countries, I find the Canadian Rockies pretty good, only living in northern Europe would interest me now (although that is fast dying as Europe is turning very much into a nanny state/region)

Silva is neat - thanks for that. I find it hard to take anyone under 40 seriously though. Especially when he talks that fast, with so much material like a verbal waterfall, with thoughts as diverse and rapid as the attention span of a young person today.

Not just that, but recently a fellow trader introduced (or re-introduced) me to an old master. So immediately I compare Silva (unfairly I know) to Sowell, and given Sowell's credibility and his similarities to Friedman thinking, I tend to enjoy this much more.

It's apples and oranges, comparing economists to philosophers, but the thinking is the same, the thought processes are similar, and economists (good ones anyway) are keen students of socioeconomics and history, bordering on a little bit of simpleton philosophy which I get, most of the time

EW stuck to me for one reason - accidentally I had read Richard Schabaker before I read Robert Rhea, John Murphy, etc etc......then EW made sense. Elliot did not come up with a new theory, his interpretation was an extension of Dow's original classical TA observations, influenced by Schabaker's work. Schabkaer is arguably the father of waves or cycles, Elliot ran much further with them. Given the inter-connectivity of EW with Fibonacci sequencing, the cross linking of the golden ratio with everything....it was not hard for me to give credence to EW, as this brought (in my mind) - things from Dow to Schabaker to Elliot to the golden ratio all together in one approach. As usual, this "works for me"....as yours does for you. But, I am still a "J" whereas, you have mellowed into an "X", so I am "righter" ??


Last edited by Deucalion; April 5th, 2012 at 08:12 AM.
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  #113 (permalink)
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Well, I guess philosophy is something I feel strongly about. I had decided on getting a degree in it, but then I found trading. I delved into existentialism as a teenager, but then I moved on to logical positivism. That helped me regain my love for mathematics...

I've lived quite a few places myself, I spent 3 years going around the world twice. I really liked Australia, but I think Hawaii was my favorite. It's too bad it's so difficult to get a US visa. I would love to divide my time between Hawaii and California. Any intelligent, beautiful women reading this thread? Please propose via PM. I'm (relatively) young, handsome and frighteningly intelligent. I like long walks, stimulating conversations and playing the ukulele.

I get what you're saying about Silva, but I quite like it. His way of combining interesting thoughts with beautiful imagery and sound is high art in my book. However, I generally prefer my intellectual candy to be more slow-paced. I generally prefer older things. I watched this earlier today: Artificial Intelligence : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive .

I like the name of that blog! I actually came across Sowell last year (or was it two years ago) when I was doing some research on something else. I especially remember a debate from the 70s(?) about welfare, in which Friedman also participated. Friedman surely was an interesting creature.
Speaking of the "War on Drugs": I really admire Friedman's stance: . The Global Commission on Drugs supports his view (http://www.globalcommissionondrugs.org/wp-content/themes/gcdp_v1/pdf/Global_Commission_Report_English.pdf). In the last few months we've had some discussion about legalizing marijuana here in Norway. Several of the youth parties are in favor, but the discussion has not been very productive so far. It's sad to see the replies by those opposed; it's usually non-factual emotional drivel. I don't smoke, or plan to, but I think it's stupid to devote excessive resources to a "war" that isn't winnable. It also diverts resources which could have been better spent on fighting hard crime.

I have an affinity for old TA "scriptures": Schabacker, Dow, Hamilton, Wyckoff, Watts, MacKay, de Villiers, Selden, "Guyon" and Edwards & Magee. However, I also enjoy Graham and Dodd, and Loeb.

Then you have guys like Baruch and Livermore. Both excellent market practitioners, and in a class of their own.

Paul Tudor Jones has spoken about EW a few times, he even mentions it in his documentary. In the foreword to Fisher's "The Logical Trader", he states that Prechter's book is one of five books he requires new traders to read. I actually watched Precther's documentary a few months ago History’s Hidden Engine . I fully agree that society is cyclical, but I'm not fully understanding the predictive value of EW.

I think you are the only one who has been negative to my drifting toward "X", but I see your point. I've come so far that I will openly admit that you are "righter", but I'll think the opposite quietly. We'll see how long I manage to keep the "J" at bay...

By the way, I want to clarify that my hatred for the world is based on the belief that we, as conscious creatures, could have done so much better.


Last edited by Lornz; April 5th, 2012 at 07:21 PM.
 
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Lornz View Post
Well, I guess philosophy is something I feel strongly about. I had decided on getting a degree in it, but then I found trading. I delved into existentialism as a teenager, but then I moved on to logical positivism. That helped me regain my love for mathematics...

I've lived quite a few places myself, I spent 3 years going around the world twice. I really liked Australia, but I think Hawaii was my favorite. It's too bad it's so difficult to get a US visa. I would love to divide my time between Hawaii and California. Any intelligent, beautiful women reading this thread? Please propose via PM. I'm (relatively) young, handsome and frighteningly intelligent. I like long walks, stimulating conversations and playing the ukulele.

I get what you're saying about Silva, but I quite like it. His way of combining interesting thoughts with beautiful imagery and sound is high art in my book. However, I generally prefer my intellectual candy to be more slow-paced. I generally prefer older things. I watched this earlier today: Artificial Intelligence : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive .

I like the name of that blog! I actually came across Sowell last year (or was it two years ago) when I was doing some research on something else. I especially remember a debate from the 70s(?) about welfare, in which Friedman also participated. Friedman surely was an interesting creature.
Speaking of the "War on Drugs": I really admire Friedman's stance: . The Global Commission on Drugs supports his view (http://www.globalcommissionondrugs.org/wp-content/themes/gcdp_v1/pdf/Global_Commission_Report_English.pdf). In the last few months we've had some discussion about legalizing marijuana here in Norway. Several of the youth parties are in favor, but the discussion has not been very productive so far. It's sad to see the replies by those opposed; it's usually non-factual emotional drivel. I don't smoke, or plan to, but I think it's stupid to devote excessive resources to a "war" that isn't winnable. It also diverts resources which could have been better spent on fighting hard crime.

I have an affinity for old TA "scriptures": Schabacker, Dow, Hamilton, Wyckoff, Watts, MacKay, de Villiers, Selden, "Guyon" and Edwards & Magee. However, I also enjoy Graham and Dodd, and Loeb.

Then you have guys like Baruch and Livermore. Both excellent market practitioners, and in a class of their own.

Paul Tudor Jones has spoken about EW a few times, he even mentions it in his documentary. In the foreword to Fisher's "The Logical Trader", he states that Prechter's book is one of five books he requires new traders to read. I actually watched Precther's documentary a few months ago History’s Hidden Engine . I fully agree that society is cyclical, but I'm not fully understanding the predictive value of EW.

I think you are the only one who has been negative to my drifting toward "X", but I see your point. I've come so far that I will openly admit that you are "righter", but I'll think the opposite quietly. We'll see how long I manage to keep the "J" at bay...

By the way, I want to clarify that my hatred for the world is based on the belief that we, as conscious creatures, could have done so much better.

This thread is awesome, I can read cool shit, not get into arguments with petty minds and just talk. Watch funky videos......

BTW, thanks on the neuroplasticity book link (Schwartz & Begley) - I am sold, Didn't do anything initially, But after going over Luminosity, CogniFIT and CogMed...I ended with with IQ Mindware's program.....on their forum...there are links to interesting research on brain rehabilitation from neuro-trauma medical research that feeds into the concept of neuroplasticity - some cutting edge stuff that indicated that as neuroplasticity gains a wider audience and research dollars, specific activities can eventually be developed in the future to channel development of specific functions - sort of like specific exercises to isolate fast fibers and slow twitch fibers in muscle tissue. Just imagining and understanding that the synapses can be re-rewired is mind blowing (pun intended). Not just in the area of undoing brain damage, but allowing the brain to perform at a higher level on trading endeavors .........A "Treadstone" program to create a "Jason Bourne" of trading ...perhaps.......woot! That's also where I got a referral to Begley and Schwartz's book - should have it shortly).

Friedman / Chomsky / Rand / Sowell - same view on drugs / war / colonialism / "occupation-ism" etc etc...all the hot button topics...no one wants to touch. I got a dirty look when I wanted my licence plate to read "KAOS" or "NRKST"....the desk clerk looked at me as if I was a child molester....anarchy is a bad word apparently with the wildebeest...who need to be told how to live, who need rules for everything...pretty soon we will told how to raise our children as well (wait, that ship already sailed)....rules....rules for rules and on top of other rules.......

I lit a fuse the other day, told a bunch of guys that no one has the right to tell Iran NOT to build weapons, how can we dictate that...I knew exactly what the response was....I wasn't disappointed...we are so predictable...... At the moment I said that to make the evening more interesting an be an "ass" ...(but in seriousness I very much support that view.....no one has the right to tell others what to do)

Be that nihilist "J" type, revel in your madness, it is your signature you were here.....be a polite asshole

This neatly leads me to EW - people claim EW is too subjective, too vague, multiple answers to everything, and that you never how how to use it......this appeals to me......EW waves can be isolated....no need to identify a complete 5W (with all its attendant intra-wave distribution)...I do okay (for me) trading 6months of the year trading just a part of the wave....and drinking scotch the other 6 months of the year......I don't have to have rules for EW...I like chaos, it ruffles other peoples' feathers, people lose their bearings, they make bad decisons...in their lives and with their capital...that creates short term market inefficiencies.............that all one needs .....The prediction bit works only if you identify major waves (isolating minor and intermedaite waves is not good enough)...because the major waves can kill if one is trading against it........

PS - I can't help but phrase things with double entendre, I know you get it - hope others do (if not, too bad)


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holder

 
  #116 (permalink)
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Nothing is probably more annoying than a greenhorn dispensing advice, but, if there are others like me out there, it might be helpful anyway. I tried taking a few introductory classes in several languages, but I really didn't how they introduced the subject. Then I stumbled across an old course from MIT (MIT OpenCourseWare | Electrical Engineering and Computer Science | 6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, Spring 2005 | Home).
I found it to be magical, but, judging by the reviews at Amazon, apparently it's a love/hate thing (Amazon.com: Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs - 2nd Edition (MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science) (9780262510875): Harold Abelson, Gerald Jay Sussman, Julie Sussman: Books). The book is available for free here: Welcome to the SICP Web Site . Someone even made a free version for Kindle that's floating around.

After viewing the first couple of lectures, I searched the net for more information about LISP and Scheme. Among other things, I came across Matthias Felleisen (Matthias Felleisen), which has written several books about Scheme. Most notably is his How To Design Program (How to Design Programs Amazon.com: How to Design Programs: An Introduction to Programming and Computing (9780262062183): Matthias Felleisen, Robert Bruce Findler, Matthew Flatt, Shriram Krishnamurthi: Books). I actually haven't gone through that yet, but apparently it's quite good. I watched a few talks by him, though.




Suddenly things started to make sense, and I signed up for some CS at my local university thinking that I wanted to become a programmer. However, I was quite disappointed with how things are structured. I can't understand why LISP (or a dialect) isn't used in all first courses. It's much easier to grasp the concepts with LISP, whereas other languages only leaves me with more question about their structure. Anyway, as I continued my research, I found David S. Touretzky's book Common Lisp: A Gentle Introduction to Symbolic Computation (Common Lisp: A Gentle Introduction to Symbolic Computation). That is, hands down, the most excellent introduction to programming I've seen. It has no prerequisites other than a basic understanding of arithmetic (as opposed to calculus for SICP and algebra for HTDP). The book is full of graphical models that very clearly illustrates the concepts. I could not put it down once I started reading. I ended up completing that book before doing the rest of the SICP lectures, and that probably made those more enjoyable also.

I must say, I I recently started on Norvig's PAIP ( Amazon.com: Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming: Case Studies in Common Lisp (9781558601918): Peter Norvig: Books) and it's really fun. My plan is to go through Paul Graham's book after that (On Lisp).

Brian Harvey also taught an intro CS course based on the SICP book (UC Berkeley Webcasts | Video and Podcasts:), but now LISP, as the first course at MIT was in 2008, has been replaced with Python. Berkeley still uses the framework of the SICP book, though. Paul Hilfinger taught the class this semester (UC Berkeley Webcasts | Video and Podcasts: / CS 61A Home Page). I just finished the Udacity CS 101, and plan to do the Berkeley class to further my Python skills a little. However, I think I'm going to go through Dennis Ritchie's book on C first (Amazon.com: C Programming Language (2nd Edition) (0076092003106): Brian W. Kernighan, Dennis M. Ritchie: Books). I feel it makes sense to learn a little about the low-level stuff also. Hopefully I'll manage to keep my OCD from forcing me to work down to assembly level.

Anyway, the whole point of this long-winded post was to express my love for Touretzky's book. Regardless of which language one wishes to learn, I think that book is a good place to start. Common Lisp: A Gentle Introduction to Symbolic Computation

Other resources of interest:

ADUni.org: ArsDigita University Alumni Website

Stanford School of Engineering - Stanford Engineering Everywhere

Free Online Course Materials | Audio/Video Courses | MIT OpenCourseWare

https://www.coursera.org

A neat way of keeping track of all upcoming classes:
Class Central ? A complete list of free online courses offered by Stanford's Coursera, MIT's MITx, and Udacity


I'm also very excited about what MITx might deliver this fall. Hopefully one can take science classes of all kinds for credit :
MITx: MIT's new online learning initiative

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A couple of documentaries I watched last Christmas. It's apparent that this is the year I go full nerd!





 
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This is the most awesome one yet... Get ready for total brain melt:


 
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Deucalion View Post


This thread is awesome, I can read cool shit, not get into arguments with petty minds and just talk. Watch funky videos......

BTW, thanks on the neuroplasticity book link (Schwartz & Begley) - I am sold, Didn't do anything initially, But after going over Luminosity, CogniFIT and CogMed...I ended with with IQ Mindware's program.....on their forum...there are links to interesting research on brain rehabilitation from neuro-trauma medical research that feeds into the concept of neuroplasticity - some cutting edge stuff that indicated that as neuroplasticity gains a wider audience and research dollars, specific activities can eventually be developed in the future to channel development of specific functions - sort of like specific exercises to isolate fast fibers and slow twitch fibers in muscle tissue. Just imagining and understanding that the synapses can be re-rewired is mind blowing (pun intended). Not just in the area of undoing brain damage, but allowing the brain to perform at a higher level on trading endeavors .........A "Treadstone" program to create a "Jason Bourne" of trading ...perhaps.......woot! That's also where I got a referral to Begley and Schwartz's book - should have it shortly).

Friedman / Chomsky / Rand / Sowell - same view on drugs / war / colonialism / "occupation-ism" etc etc...all the hot button topics...no one wants to touch. I got a dirty look when I wanted my licence plate to read "KAOS" or "NRKST"....the desk clerk looked at me as if I was a child molester....anarchy is a bad word apparently with the wildebeest...who need to be told how to live, who need rules for everything...pretty soon we will told how to raise our children as well (wait, that ship already sailed)....rules....rules for rules and on top of other rules.......

I lit a fuse the other day, told a bunch of guys that no one has the right to tell Iran NOT to build weapons, how can we dictate that...I knew exactly what the response was....I wasn't disappointed...we are so predictable...... At the moment I said that to make the evening more interesting an be an "ass" ...(but in seriousness I very much support that view.....no one has the right to tell others what to do)

Be that nihilist "J" type, revel in your madness, it is your signature you were here.....be a polite asshole

This neatly leads me to EW - people claim EW is too subjective, too vague, multiple answers to everything, and that you never how how to use it......this appeals to me......EW waves can be isolated....no need to identify a complete 5W (with all its attendant intra-wave distribution)...I do okay (for me) trading 6months of the year trading just a part of the wave....and drinking scotch the other 6 months of the year......I don't have to have rules for EW...I like chaos, it ruffles other peoples' feathers, people lose their bearings, they make bad decisons...in their lives and with their capital...that creates short term market inefficiencies.............that all one needs .....The prediction bit works only if you identify major waves (isolating minor and intermedaite waves is not good enough)...because the major waves can kill if one is trading against it........

PS - I can't help but phrase things with double entendre, I know you get it - hope others do (if not, too bad)


Well, I rendered my placeholder post useless by taking an inordinate amount of time.

Yes, it's a cool thread. That's why I started it. I was hoping it would bring out more discussion, though. It seems only people sharing squiggly lines get attention...

You must report back on your experience with IQ Mindware. There's a lot going on that field. There is a research project at my university which focuses on brain plasticity and grey matter expansion. The results have been promising so far. I'm hoping to do a PET scan in not to long, and really start exploring the neural pathways. The next step is incorporating psychedelics -- the greatest untapped resource of modern times?

I've been trying to get that off the ground for years, but this has made it easier: Sobered up using LSD




Study: Psilocybin, the Drug in 'Magic Mushrooms,' Lifts Mood and Increases Compassion Over the Long Term | Healthland | TIME.com

I'm hoping to be the first to participate in/co-sponsor a clinical trial of LSD for OCD. I've been working on a theory of treatment for years, and I think it looks promising. The key lies in its properties as a 5-HT2A antagonist, which is not new, of course.

Ever since I read Amazon.com: Doors of Perception, the (Flamingo Modern Classics) (9780006547310): ALDOUS HUXLEY: Books in my teens, I've been extremely fascinated by the connection between consciousness and the unconscious mind.

Its importance in the revolution of computer science (among other things) at Berkely in the 60s is fascinating for sure. Even in modern days it seems one can trace some progress to LSD. LSD: The Geek's Wonder Drug?

Arne Næss, one of the greatest intellectuals of my tiny nation, said this:
Is it Painful to Think?: Conversations with Arne Næss - David Rothenberg, Arne Næss - Google Bøker

If you think the War on Drugs is a hot topic, try convincing people that LSD as a vehicle for treatment makes sense...

Sadly, people often lack the ability to think rationally and logically. LSD poses virtually no risk physiological harm, but psychological side-effects might occur. It seems that this only works as trigger for preexisting conditions, and does not cause anything by itself. It seems that latent inhibiton plays a part in one's ability to handle the substance. (Latent inhibition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) Roughly translated: It might lead to sensory overload for people of average intelligence or less, but it might have a potential for personal growth for highly intelligent individuals. If one considers the nature of psychedelics, I would claim that such a theory seems intuitively valid.

My focus, quite naturally, is on OCD, but the basic theories holds true for any behavioral modification. OCD is the ultimate "brain lock", everything else, except schizophrenia perhaps, should be slightly easier to untangle.

It seems your trading is eerily similar to my longer-term approach, at least philosophically. The market ebbs and flows; try not to wipe out too often...

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Lornz View Post
Well, I rendered my placeholder post useless by taking an inordinate amount of time.

Yes, it's a cool thread. That's why I started it. I was hoping it would bring out more discussion, though. It seems only people sharing squiggly lines get attention...

You must report back on your experience with IQ Mindware. There's a lot going on that field. There is a research project at my university which focuses on brain plasticity and grey matter expansion. The results have been promising so far. I'm hoping to do a PET scan in not to long, and really start exploring the neural pathways. The next step is incorporating psychedelics -- the greatest untapped resource of modern times?

I've been trying to get that off the ground for years, but this has made it easier: Sobered up using LSD




Study: Psilocybin, the Drug in 'Magic Mushrooms,' Lifts Mood and Increases Compassion Over the Long Term | Healthland | TIME.com

I'm hoping to be the first to participate in/co-sponsor a clinical trial of LSD for OCD. I've been working on a theory of treatment for years, and I think it looks promising. The key lies in its properties as a 5-HT2A antagonist, which is not new, of course.

Ever since I read Amazon.com: Doors of Perception, the (Flamingo Modern Classics) (9780006547310): ALDOUS HUXLEY: Books in my teens, I've been extremely fascinated by the connection between consciousness and the unconscious mind.

Its importance in the revolution of computer science (among other things) at Berkely in the 60s is fascinating for sure. Even in modern days it seems one can trace some progress to LSD. LSD: The Geek's Wonder Drug?

Arne Næss, one of the greatest intellectuals of my tiny nation, said this:
Is it Painful to Think?: Conversations with Arne Næss - David Rothenberg, Arne Næss - Google Bøker

If you think the War on Drugs is a hot topic, try convincing people that LSD as a vehicle for treatment makes sense...

Sadly, people often lack the ability to think rationally and logically. LSD poses virtually no risk physiological harm, but psychological side-effects might occur. It seems that this only works as trigger for preexisting conditions, and does not cause anything by itself. It seems that latent inhibiton plays a part in one's ability to handle the substance. (Latent inhibition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) Roughly translated: It might lead to sensory overload for people of average intelligence or less, but it might have a potential for personal growth for highly intelligent individuals. If one considers the nature of psychedelics, I would claim that such a theory seems intuitively valid.

My focus, quite naturally, is on OCD, but the basic theories holds true for any behavioral modification. OCD is the ultimate "brain lock", everything else, except schizophrenia perhaps, should be slightly easier to untangle.

It seems your trading is eerily similar to my longer-term approach, at least philosophically. The market ebbs and flows; try not to wipe out too often...

I am not a scientist and so I will refuse to argue any of the points or ideas put forth here as I simply don't understand....but I had a cousin on LSD who we had to teach to tie his shoes once he got off. The stuff simply fried his brain.....he is permanently disabled but can function in society albeit with difficulty....I'm not convinced its "safe".

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication, Leonardo da Vinci


Most people chose unhappiness over uncertainty, Tim Ferris

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