Trading Of Over The Counter Gold And Silver To Be Illegal Beginning July 15 - Commodities Futures Trading | futures io social day trading
futures io futures trading


Trading Of Over The Counter Gold And Silver To Be Illegal Beginning July 15
Updated: Views / Replies:4,963 / 29
Created: by tellytub Attachments:1

Welcome to futures io.

(If you already have an account, login at the top of the page)

futures io is the largest futures trading community on the planet, with over 90,000 members. At futures io, our goal has always been and always will be to create a friendly, positive, forward-thinking community where members can openly share and discuss everything the world of trading has to offer. The community is one of the friendliest you will find on any subject, with members going out of their way to help others. Some of the primary differences between futures io and other trading sites revolve around the standards of our community. Those standards include a code of conduct for our members, as well as extremely high standards that govern which partners we do business with, and which products or services we recommend to our members.

At futures io, our focus is on quality education. No hype, gimmicks, or secret sauce. The truth is: trading is hard. To succeed, you need to surround yourself with the right support system, educational content, and trading mentors – all of which you can find on futures io, utilizing our social trading environment.

With futures io, you can find honest trading reviews on brokers, trading rooms, indicator packages, trading strategies, and much more. Our trading review process is highly moderated to ensure that only genuine users are allowed, so you don’t need to worry about fake reviews.

We are fundamentally different than most other trading sites:
  • We are here to help. Just let us know what you need.
  • We work extremely hard to keep things positive in our community.
  • We do not tolerate rude behavior, trolling, or vendors advertising in posts.
  • We firmly believe in and encourage sharing. The holy grail is within you, we can help you find it.
  • We expect our members to participate and become a part of the community. Help yourself by helping others.

You'll need to register in order to view the content of the threads and start contributing to our community.  It's free and simple.

-- Big Mike, Site Administrator

Reply
 1  
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 

Trading Of Over The Counter Gold And Silver To Be Illegal Beginning July 15

  #11 (permalink)
Elite Member
Berlin, Europe
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: NinjaTrader, MultiCharts
Broker/Data: Interactive Brokers
Favorite Futures: Keyboard
 
Fat Tails's Avatar
 
Posts: 9,653 since Mar 2010
Thanks: 4,226 given, 25,601 received
Forum Reputation: Legendary


RM99 View Post
The problem with all you socialists is that you're too soft to let anyone fail for being dumb or incompetent.

We should have let the banks fail. We should have brought the whole global economy crashing down...only then would we have learned the true lesson. As it were, we'll regulate for a bit, and then when everyone has forgotten, we'll go right back to the old routine....gambling and robbing.

In summary...."A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something that can be learned in no other way." -Mark Twain.

Confusing Economic Science and Socialism

Little you know about the economy, nothing you know about socialism, because you have not done your homework. I am far from being a socialist, but I am a defender of free markets.

I agree on the banks. The banks were unregulated, so their balance sheets were all interlinked via dubious OTC trades - in particular credit default swaps and collateralized debt obligations. If these instruments had been regulated and traded via an exchange with an appropriate management of counterparty risk, easy would it have been to allow for bank failures. But interlinkage more than size created moral hazard, the failure managers were not punished but saved from failure.

The crucial point is that free markets do NOT work. You need a regulated market, which includes the careful design of a mechanism that allows for competion. This has nothing to do with socialism. You are preaching a soccer game without rules and without an arbiter. This means going back 1000 years in history and ignoring all the achievements that have been made since the renaissance.

The world is no longer a place for uneducated wannabee-John-Waynes like George Bush, who engage in criminal acts and thereby create harm to the reputation of the US in the world. Following this path just leads to extinction of species, destruction of natural resources and finally to distribution wars. The "tragedy of the commons" problem is more acute than ever.


Deregulation Created Moral Hazard and Allowed for Ignoring Counterparty Risk

Actually it was the deregulation, which started during the Reagon/Thatcher periods that allowed the banks to engage in all sorts of dubious contracts. This created an interlinkage preventing some of them from failure. Failure is only possible, if counterparty risk is controlled and partly mutualized. Counterparty risk is mmonitored in the regulated market place, but not in OTC business. In a regulated market you need to deposit a margin to cover the counterparty risk. Another point is transparency, which favors price discovery. A regulated market place allows for price discovery. The OTC segment of the market relies on price discovery in primary regulated markets.


OTC is a Way of Defecting in Terms of Game Theory

So OTC and dark pools are damaging the markets

- because they do not contribute to price discovery
- they do not allow for equal access to markets by all participants, but favor monopolies or oligopolies
- they do not manage counterparty risk in an appropriate way

In terms of game theory this behavior is called defection. Defection explains why a Nash equilibrium does not need to be Pareto efficient, or why markets fail. Defection is also the base for moral hazard.

What about reading some books on

-> socialism
-> game theory
-> mechanism design theory
-> non-linear dynamics

to get a better idea of what is going on?

Sorry for my outspokenness, but you have heavily insulted me (not personally but intellectually) by calling me a socialist.

McCarthy died in 1957, you don't want to start that all over?


Last edited by Fat Tails; June 20th, 2011 at 06:38 PM.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users say Thank You to Fat Tails for this post:
 
  #12 (permalink)
Elite Member
Houston,Tx
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: NinjaTrader
Broker/Data: Mirus Futures/Zen-Fire
Favorite Futures: TF
 
ThatManFromTexas's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,302 since Feb 2010
Thanks: 1,208 given, 4,293 received

The world according to ThatManFromTexas;

Feudalism: You have two cows. The lord of the manor takes some of the milk. And all the cream.

Pure Socialism: You have two cows. The government takes them and puts them in a barn with everyone else's cows. You have to take care of all the cows. The government gives you as much milk as you need.

Socialism: You have two cows. The government takes one of your cows and gives it to your neighbor. You're both forced to join a cooperative where you have to teach your neighbor how to take care of his cow.

Bureaucratic Socialism: You have two cows. The government takes them and puts them in a barn with everyone else's cows. They are cared for by ex-chicken farmers. You have to take care of the chickens the government took from the chicken farmers. The government gives you as much milk and as many eggs as its regulations say you should need.

Fascism: You have two cows. The government takes both, hires you to take care of them, and sells you the milk.

Pure Communism: You have two cows. Your neighbors help you take care of them, and you all share the milk.

Russian Communism: You have two cows. You have to take care of them, but the government takes all the milk.

Communism: You have two cows. The government seizes both and provides you with milk. You wait in line for you share of the milk, but it's so long that the milk is sour by the time you get it.

Dictatorship: You have two cows. The government takes both and shoots you.

Militarism: You have two cows. The government takes both and drafts you.

Pure Democracy: You have two cows. Your neighbors decide who gets the milk.

Representative Democracy: You have two cows. Your neighbors pick someone to tell you who gets the milk.

American Democracy: The government promises to give you two cows if you vote for it. After the election, the president is impeached for speculating in cow futures. The press dubs the affair "Cowgate." The cows are set free.

Democracy, Democrat-style: You have two cows. Your neighbor has none. You feel guilty for being so successful. You vote politicians into office who tax your cows, which forces you to sell one to pay the tax. The politicians use the tax money to buy a cow for your neighbor. You feel good. Barbra Streisand sings for you.

Democracy, Republican-style: You have two cows. Your neighbor has none. You move to a better neighborhood.

Indian Democracy: You have two cows. You worship them.

British Democracy: You have two cows. You feed them sheep brains and they go mad. The government gives you compensation for your diseased cows, compensation for your lost income, and a grant not to use your fields for anything else. And tells the public not to worry.

Bureaucracy: You have two cows. At first the government regulates what you can feed them and when you can milk them. Then it pays you not to milk them. After that it takes both, shoots one, milks the other, and pours the milk down the drain. Then it requires you to fill out forms accounting for the missing cows.

Anarchy: You have two cows. Either you sell the milk at a fair price or your neighbors try to kill you and take the cows.

Capitalism: You have two cows. You lay one off, and force the other to produce the milk of four cows. You are surprised when she drops dead.

Singaporean Democracy: You have two cows. The government fines you for keeping two unlicensed farm animals in an apartment.

Hong Kong Capitalism (alias Enron Capitalism):
You have two cows.
You sell three of them to your publicly-listed company, using letters of credit opened by your brother-in-law at the bank, then execute an debt/equity swap with associated general offer so that you get all four cows back, with a tax deduction for keeping five cows.
The milk rights of six cows are transferred via a Panamanian intermediary to a Cayman Isands company secretly owned by the majority shareholder, who sells the rights to all seven cows' milk back to the listed company.
The annual report says that the company owns eight cows, with an option on one more.
Meanwhile, you kill the two cows because the Feng Shui is bad.

Environmentalism: You have two cows. The government bans you from milking or killing them.

Totalitarianism: You have two cows. The government takes them and denies they ever existed. Milk is banned.

Foreign Policy, American-Style: You have two cows. The government taxes them and uses the money to buy a cow for a poor farmer a country ruled by a dictator. The farmer has no hay to feed the cow and his religion forbids him from eating it. The cow dies. The man dies. The dictator confiscates the dead man's farm and sells it, using the money to purchase US military equipment. The President declares the program a success and announces closer ties with our new ally.

Bureaucracy, American-Style: You have two cows but you have to kill one of them because the government will only give you a license for one of them. The license requires you to sell all your milk to the government, which uses it to make cheese. The government pays lots of money to store the cheese in refrigerated warehouses. When the cheese spoils, the government distributes it to the poor. The poor get sick from the cheese, go to the emergency room, and are turned away because they have no health insurance. The President declares the program a success and reminds us that we have the finest health care system in the world.

American Corporation: You have two cows. You sell one to a subsidiary company and lease it back to yourself so you can declare it as a tax loss. Your bosses give you a huge bonus. You inject the cows with drugs and they produce four times the normal amount of milk. Your bosses give you a huge bonus. When the drugs cause one of the cows to drop dead you announce to the press that you have down-sized, reducing expenses by 50 percent. The company stock goes up and your bosses give you a huge bonus. You lay off all your workers and move your production facilities to Mexico. You get a huge bonus. You contribute some of your profit to the President's re-election campaign. The President announces tax cuts for corporations in order to stimulate the economy.

Japanese Corporation: You have two cows. You redesign them so they are one-tenth the size of an ordinary cow and produce twenty times the milk. You teach the cows to travel on unbelievably crowded trains. Your cows always get higher test scores than cows in the U.S. or Europe, but they drink a lot of sake.

German Corporation: You have two cows. You engineer them so they are all blond, drink lots of beer, give excellent milk, and run a hundred miles an hour. Unfortunately they also demand 13 weeks of vacation per year and are very expensive to repair.

Russian Corporation: You have two cows. You have some vodka. You count your cows and discover you really have five cows! You have more vodka. You count them again and discover you have 42 cows! You stop counting cows and have some more vodka. The Russian Mafia arrives and takes over all your cows. You have more vodka.

Italian Corporation: You have two cows but you can't find them. While searching for them you meet a beautiful woman, take her out to lunch and then make love to her. Life is good.

French Corporation: You have two cows. You go on strike because you want another cow, more vacation and shorter work weeks. The French government announces that it will never agree to your demands. You go to lunch and eat fabulous food and drink wonderful wine. While you are at lunch, the airline pilots and flight controllers join your strike, shutting down all air traffic. The truckers block all the roads and the dock workers block all the ports. By dinner time the French government announces it agrees with all your demands. Life is good.

Political Correctness: You are associated with (the concept of "ownership" is an outdated symbol of your decadent, warmongering, intolerant past) two differently-aged (but no less valuable to society) bovines of non-specified gender. They get married and adopt a calf.

Counterculturalism: Wow, dude, there's like . . . these two cows, man. You have got to have some of this milk.

Surrealism: You have two giraffes. The government requires you to take harmonica lessons.

I'm just a simple man trading a simple plan.

My daddy always said, "Every day above ground is a good day!"
Reply With Quote
The following 7 users say Thank You to ThatManFromTexas for this post:
 
  #13 (permalink)
Fortitudo et Honor
Austin, TX
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: TradeStation
Favorite Futures: Futures
 
Posts: 882 since Mar 2011
Thanks: 128 given, 703 received


Best post I've seen on futures.io (formerly BMT)

Reply With Quote
 
  #14 (permalink)
Fortitudo et Honor
Austin, TX
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: TradeStation
Favorite Futures: Futures
 
Posts: 882 since Mar 2011
Thanks: 128 given, 703 received


Fat Tails View Post
Confusing Economic Science and Socialism

Little you know about the economy, nothing you know about socialism, because you have not done your homework. I am far from being a socialist, but I am a defender of free markets.

I agree on the banks. The banks were unregulated, so their balance sheets were all interlinked via dubious OTC trades - in particular credit default swaps and collaterlized debt obligations. If these instruments had been regulated and traded via an exchange with an appropriate management of counterparty risk, easy would it have been to allow for bank failures, what is absolutely needed to punish the incompetent. But interlinkage more than size created moral hazard, the failure manager were not punished but saved from failure.

The crucial point is that free markets do NOT work, you need a regulated market, which includes the careful design of a mechanism that allows for competion. This has nothing to do with socialism. You are preaching a soccer game without rules and without an arbitre. This mean going back a 1000 years in history ignoring all the achievements since the renaissance.

The world is no longer a place for uneducated wannabee-John-Waynes like Goerge Bush, who engage in criminal acts and thereby create harm to the reputation of the US in the world. Following this path just leads to extinction of species, destruction of natural resources and in the end to distribution wars. The "tragedy of the commons" problem is more acute than ever.


Deregulation Created Moral Hazard and Allowed for Ignoring Counterparty Risk

Actually it was the deregulation, which started during the Reagon/Thatcher periods, that allowed the banks to engage in all sorts of dubious contracts creating in an interlinkage preventing some of them from failure. Failure is only possible, if counterparty risk is controlled and partly mutulaized. Unlike OTC business, there is a monitoring of counterparty risk in the regulated market places. You need to deposit a maring to cover the counterparty risk. For OTC trades there was not. The second reason is transparency, which favors price discovery. A regulated market place allows for price discovery, after all we can only traded, because prices are made available. The OTC segment of the market relies on price discovery in primary regulated markets.


OTC is a Way of Defecting in Terms of Game Theory

So the OTC - and dark pools - are indeed dangerous, are unwanted

- because they do not contribute to price discovery
- they do not allow for equal access to markets by all participants, but favor monopolies or oligopolies
- they do not in an appropriate way manage counterparty risk

In terms of game theory this behavior is called defection. Defection explains why a Nash equilibrium does not need to be Pareto efficient, or why markets fail. Defection is also the base for moral hazard.

Why do you make ideological statements on subjects that you do not understand and don't have studied? What about reading some books on

-> socialism
-> game theory
-> mechanism design theory
-> non-linear dynamics

just to get some clues of what is going on?


Sorry for my outspokenness, but you have heavily insulted me (not personally but intellectually) by calling me a socialist.

McCarthy died in 1957, you don't want to start that all over?

Regulation is what got us into this whole mess...not deregulation.

You see, in a FREE MARKET, greed counteracts greed. Stockholders and Employees do what's in the best interest of the company. Sometimes that means being greedy. Most of the time it means ensuring you stay competitive and survive another day amongs all the other companies.

Back before liberal socialists invaded Washington, if you wanted to buy a house, you needed good credit, good job with good work history, a downpayment. You were lucky to move into a 3 bedroom house with 2 baths and a garage and a fenced backyard that was 20 years old. This was your first (meager) home. After paying your mortgage for 15 straight years, you either sold the house and used the equity to move into your dream home, or you took out an equity loan and fixed up your older home into your dream home.

Along come the Democrats. They see that home ownership is a very common aspect of the path to prosperity. One of them gets a grand idea. Let's give loans to "underprivelaged" people so that they too can enjoy the American dream. Barney Frank and his cast of well meaning idiots craft and pass the "Community Reinvestment Act of 1977." This legislation basically tells the banks, they have to loan to "subprime" individuals under threat of credit restrictions from the Federal Government. This is what affectionately creates the original "subprime" market.

During the 1990's times were great and the government pushed for even more leniency through FHA sponsored loans (backed by Fannie and Freddie). Now you could not only own a home, you could do it with bad credit, little to no downpayment, finance the closing costs as part of the loan, sign an adjustable rate mortgage and move into a BRAND NEW, 4 bedroom 3.5 bath 3 car garage house with a pool. After all, John Q Public deserves the American dream.

The subprime market was the fuel which fed the fire. You can have all the spark in the world....you can have Greenspan dumping massive amounts of cash, you can have crooked mortgage brokers, you can even have evil scheming bankers who create all sorts of products and you can have ratings companies that look the other way.

Without fuel to burn the spark is useless. The massive amounts of free money from Greenspan is the other component that if removed, would have probably prevented the entire thing (or at least greatly muted it). If you REMOVE the subprime market....then there's no victims. No influx of demand to overstimulate construction which spiked supply, no idiots to default on the homes they couldn't afford.

Like most catastrophes, it was a confluence of factors that all played a part, but the main two were the creation of the subprime market and massive amounts of free money. All the CDO's and default swaps and adjustable rate mortgages and mountains of sheetrock are useless without them.

So, in closing, it's when the government messes with an already healthy system (albeit with good intentions) that unintended, unanticipated consequences always ocurr.

Reply With Quote
 
  #15 (permalink)
Elite Member
Berlin, Europe
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: NinjaTrader, MultiCharts
Broker/Data: Interactive Brokers
Favorite Futures: Keyboard
 
Fat Tails's Avatar
 
Posts: 9,653 since Mar 2010
Thanks: 4,226 given, 25,601 received
Forum Reputation: Legendary


RM99 View Post
Regulation is what got us into this whole mess...not deregulation.

You see, in a FREE MARKET, greed counteracts greed. Stockholders and Employees do what's in the best interest of the company. Sometimes that means being greedy. Most of the time it means ensuring you stay competitive and survive another day amongs all the other companies.

You have no answer to market failures, limits of self-regulation, mechanism design. You are repeating your religion, without having studied the subject. Could you please reply, how you want to cope with a prisoner's dilemma situation, the tragedy of the commons and moral hazard, which is a consequence of defection in free markets.


RM99 View Post
Back before liberal socialists invaded Washington, if you wanted to buy a house, you needed good credit, good job with good work history, a downpayment. You were lucky to move into a 3 bedroom house with 2 baths and a garage and a fenced backyard that was 20 years old. This was your first (meager) home. After paying your mortgage for 15 straight years, you either sold the house and used the equity to move into your dream home, or you took out an equity loan and fixed up your older home into your dream home.

Along come the Democrats. They see that home ownership is a very common aspect of the path to prosperity. One of them gets a grand idea. Let's give loans to "underprivelaged" people so that they too can enjoy the American dream. Barney Frank and his cast of well meaning idiots craft and pass the "Community Reinvestment Act of 1977." This legislation basically tells the banks, they have to loan to "subprime" individuals under threat of credit restrictions from the Federal Government. This is what affectionately creates the original "subprime" market.

During the 1990's times were great and the government pushed for even more leniency through FHA sponsored loans (backed by Fannie and Freddie). Now you could not only own a home, you could do it with bad credit, little to no downpayment, finance the closing costs as part of the loan, sign an adjustable rate mortgage and move into a BRAND NEW, 4 bedroom 3.5 bath 3 car garage house with a pool. After all, John Q Public deserves the American dream.

I absolutely agree with you. I am aware of Bill Clinton's National Homeownership Strategy. In 1997 purchase of non-GSE subprime mortgaged securities was up to $ 60 billion from $ 10 billion in 1991. This certainly was one of the foundations for the later problems that Fannie Mae and Freddy Mac ran into, before they had to be rescued with taxpayer's money.

However, this is not market regulation. It is interventionism. The soccer association is not supposed to select the players or run their own teams, they shall only set up the rules. The arbitre is not supposed to play and make a goal, but his role is to supervise the players. When the state directly or indirectly subsidizes any venture, this will mostly go wrong, if it can be done by private investors. But on the other side there are sectors, where the private sector cannot provide for an optimal solution. Again these are the cases where the Nash equilibrium will not lead to Pareto optimality. The best example in the US is education. Public education in the US is an expensive disaster.


RM99 View Post
The subprime market was the fuel which fed the fire. You can have all the spark in the world....you can have Greenspan dumping massive amounts of cash, you can have crooked mortgage brokers, you can even have evil scheming bankers who create all sorts of products and you can have ratings companies that look the other way..

Without fuel to burn the spark is useless. The massive amounts of free money from Greenspan is the other component that if removed, would have probably prevented the entire thing (or at least greatly muted it). If you REMOVE the subprime market....then there's no victims. No influx of demand to overstimulate construction which spiked supply, no idiots to default on the homes they couldn't afford.

Greenspan was put into office by a Republican president, but he cannot be blamed alone, as the Greenspan Put suggests. Abundant money also was the consequence of ever growing US trade deficitis. The money - useless abroad - was recycled into the US and significantly contributed to the disaster.


RM99 View Post
Like most catastrophes, it was a confluence of factors that all played a part, but the main two were the creation of the subprime market and massive amounts of free money. All the CDO's and default swaps and adjustable rate mortgages and mountains of sheetrock are useless without them.

So, in closing, it's when the government messes with an already healthy system (albeit with good intentions) that unintended, unanticipated consequences always ocurr.

Agree. Abundant money was the trigger, obscure over-the-counter (we are back to the subject) instruments like CDOs and CDS acted as a catalyst. Actually the delayed the bursting of the bubble. Without CDS and CDO a medium sized bubble might have exploded in 2005, with the help of these obfuscators, the full dimension of the problem remained hidden until 2007.

OTC business is harmful due to lack of transparency and complications it brings along for managing counterparty risk. An open and transparent market for CDS and CDOs - both types of instruments being regulated - would not have avoided the bubble, but some of its consequences.

Reply With Quote
The following 2 users say Thank You to Fat Tails for this post:
 
  #16 (permalink)
Membership Permanently Revoked
 
Futures Experience: Intermediate
 
Posts: 1,176 since Nov 2009
Thanks: 221 given, 844 received


ThatManFromTexas View Post
The world according to ThatManFromTexas.

thank you, finally someone with an awesome sense of humour... I needed to laugh a lot today to relax.. this did it..

Reply With Quote
 
  #17 (permalink)
Site Administrator
Manta, Ecuador
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: My own custom solution
Favorite Futures: E-mini ES S&P 500
 
Big Mike's Avatar
 
Posts: 46,240 since Jun 2009
Thanks: 29,352 given, 83,231 received


ThatManFromTexas View Post
The world according to ThatManFromTexas;

<snip cow stuff>
Please register on futures.io to view futures trading content such as post attachment(s), image(s), and screenshot(s).


Did you write that yourself or was it from another source? Brilliant stuff

Mike

Due to time constraints, please do not PM me if your question can be resolved or answered on the forum.

Need help?
1) Stop changing things. No new indicators, charts, or methods. Be consistent with what is in front of you first.
2) Start a journal and post to it daily with the trades you made to show your strengths and weaknesses.
3) Set goals for yourself to reach daily. Make them about how you trade, not how much money you make.
4) Accept responsibility for your actions. Stop looking elsewhere to explain away poor performance.
5) Where to start as a trader? Watch this webinar and read this thread for hundreds of questions and answers.
6)
Help using the forum? Watch this video to learn general tips on using the site.

If you want
to support our community, become an Elite Member.

Reply With Quote
 
  #18 (permalink)
Elite Member
Houston,Tx
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: NinjaTrader
Broker/Data: Mirus Futures/Zen-Fire
Favorite Futures: TF
 
ThatManFromTexas's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,302 since Feb 2010
Thanks: 1,208 given, 4,293 received


Big Mike View Post
Did you write that yourself or was it from another source? Brilliant stuff

Mike

Please register on futures.io to view futures trading content such as post attachment(s), image(s), and screenshot(s).

I'm just a simple man trading a simple plan.

My daddy always said, "Every day above ground is a good day!"
Reply With Quote
 
  #19 (permalink)
Elite Member
Berlin, Europe
 
Futures Experience: Advanced
Platform: NinjaTrader, MultiCharts
Broker/Data: Interactive Brokers
Favorite Futures: Keyboard
 
Fat Tails's Avatar
 
Posts: 9,653 since Mar 2010
Thanks: 4,226 given, 25,601 received
Forum Reputation: Legendary


Big Mike View Post
Did you write that yourself or was it from another source? Brilliant stuff

Mike

If those are Holstein cows, they are not socialist. Socialism never made it to Holstein.

Reply With Quote
The following user says Thank You to Fat Tails for this post:
 
  #20 (permalink)
Elite Member
Portland Oregon, United States
 
Futures Experience: Beginner
Platform: Ninjatrader®
Broker/Data: CQG, Kinetick
Favorite Futures: Gameplay Klownbine® Trading of Globex
 
Zondor's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,327 since Jul 2009
Thanks: 1,246 given, 2,635 received

Thanks for debunking


Thanks FT for taking on the shallow, mendacious and unbelievable bankster apologist arguments presented earlier.

Professor William K. Black among others makes a compelling case regarding who should be going to jail.

The list of those to whom credit is due must would have to include Ronald Reagan (not guilty by reason of senility?), William Simon, Milton Freidman, Alan Greenspan, Phil Gramm, Bob Rubin, Larry Summers, and the four Bushes: George HW, Bill, George W, and Barack.

Reply With Quote
The following 2 users say Thank You to Zondor for this post:

Reply



futures io > > > > Trading Of Over The Counter Gold And Silver To Be Illegal Beginning July 15

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Upcoming Webinars and Events (4:30PM ET unless noted)

Jigsaw Trading: TBA

Elite only

FuturesTrader71: TBA

Elite only

NinjaTrader: TBA

Jan 18

RandBots: TBA

Jan 23

GFF Brokers & CME Group: Futures & Bitcoin

Elite only

Adam Grimes: TBA

Elite only

Ran Aroussi: TBA

Elite only
     

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Best Indicators for trading Gold and Silver rishi Commodities Futures Trading 7 February 20th, 2014 08:16 PM
Why Traders Are Dumping Stocks and Buying Gold, Silver Quick Summary News and Current Events 0 June 6th, 2011 07:50 PM
Gold, silver coins to be legal currency in Utah kbit News and Current Events 0 May 22nd, 2011 10:29 PM
Gold to Silver Ratio martifc Commodities Futures Trading 10 January 25th, 2011 10:15 AM
New margins for gold, silver, etc from market close today MXASJ News and Current Events 0 January 21st, 2011 12:13 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:33 AM.

Copyright © 2017 by futures io, s.a., Av Ricardo J. Alfaro, Century Tower, Panama, +507 833-9432, info@futures.io
All information is for educational use only and is not investment advice.
There is a substantial risk of loss in trading commodity futures, stocks, options and foreign exchange products. Past performance is not indicative of future results.
no new posts
Page generated 2017-12-14 in 0.23 seconds with 20 queries on phoenix via your IP 54.227.51.103